Pupil Premium

In April 2011 the Government introduced Pupil Premium, funding which is additional to main school funding.

The purpose of the Pupil Premium is to narrow the attainment gap between pupils from low-income families and their peers by ensuring that this funding reaches the pupils who need it most. Schools have the freedom to spend this funding as they see fit based on their knowledge of pupil needs. An evaluation of the success of a school’s use of the Pupil Premium funding is focused less on the journey that a child takes through the school, but more on their ultimate levels of achievement. In order that they may achieve their full potential, each student eligible for Pupil Premium funding may require, in addition to the core offerings a school may deliver, a bespoke set of interventions, opportunities and support based on their individual needs and circumstances.

Research suggests (Source: Oxford School Improvement) that disadvantaged pupils on average:

The funding is allocated to schools on the basis of those students who have received Free School Meals at any point in the past 6 years and children who have been “in care” continuously for more than 6 months. As such their needs are inevitably diverse; for example, some of these students may not have faced economic hardship for a number of years whereas others may be presently in a low-income family environment.

It is therefore important that each year a detailed analysis of the academic profile of those students for whom the school receives the Pupil Premium is conducted, together with an evaluation of their individual needs and assessment of potential barriers to learning.

All secondary schools receive £935 for each student eligible for the Pupil Premium funding in year 7 to 11.  With £2,300 for any Looked after children (this is managed by the virtual schools). It is for schools to decide how best this funding is spent since they are best placed to assess what individual provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility. (Source: DfE website)

At Herne Bay High School approximately 29% of students in Years 7-11 are currently in receipt of Pupil Premium funding and 2.6% are Children in Care. (see cohort breakdown )For the financial year 2018/19, the school received £389,562 Pupil Premium funding from the Government.  Herne Bay High School allocates the Pupil Premium funding in the four key areas of Leadership, Student Welfare, Curriculum Staffing and Targeted Strategies & Initiatives. 

2019/20 Cohort breakdown

 

Total Students

PP Students

PP Students %

CIC Students

CIC Students %

7

275

91

33.09

8

2.91

8

267

82

30.71

6

2.25

9

271

66

24.35

4

1.48

10

254

71

27.95

7

2.76

11

251

75

29.88

9

3.59

TOTAL

1318

385

29.21

34

2.58

 

2018-19 Pupil Premium Expenditure

 

£

% of PP funding

Leadership 

Including allocated Vice Principal time, Director of Inclusion, Director of PP and Raising Achievement Coordinators.

  • Focusing on enacting key elements of the Sutton Trust research findings related to meta-cognitive elements and improving the quality of teaching
  • Identifying further research and best practice to influence future PP developments at HBHS
  • Developing the school’s work working with feeder primary schools to support the most challenging youngsters
  • Developing the use of PASS (Pupil Attitudes to School and Self) data to target appropriate early interventions
  • Carrying out an impact evaluation of expenditure to inform future spending
  • Incorporation of raising achievement coordinator

£83,328

 

21%

(Met forecast)

Student Welfare

Including allocated time from Heads of Mini Community, Mini Community Support Officers, Student Welfare Team, Inclusion Team, Attendance Officer, Counselling and Youth Worker

  • Inclusion Team providing very high levels of personalised support to the school’s most challenging youngsters who experience significant barriers to their learning.  This work is particularly relevant in supporting students who may have behavioural, emotional and/or social difficulties to engage more positively with school and their learning with the aim of optimising their chances of fulfilling their potential
  • Improving contact with the harder to reach families through the work of the Inclusion Team, having a direct impact on improving children’s attendance and levels of engagement
  • Funding an Attendance Officer who focuses on both supporting and challenging students and their parents when their attendance is less than 95%
  • Part-funding a school counsellor to support individuals needs
  • Part-funding a Community Youth Worker who supports intervention programmes and coordinates Student Voice programmes.  This also supports students who may have behavioural, emotional and/or social difficulties to engage more positively with school and their learning
  • Supporting the Peer Mentoring and Peer Coaching initiatives, financing the training of the peer mentors and coaches to ensure that they have the requisite knowledge, skills and understanding to carry out their role effectively

£177,323

 

46%

(1% above forecast)

Curriculum Staffing

Including allocated time from Literacy Team, Numeracy Team and Inclusion Teaching Staff

  • Maintaining the effective literacy and numeracy programmes that are in place to support students
  • Booster English and Maths lessons for Year 11 students
  • Targeted intervention using data analysis
  • Continuation of Accelerated Reader programme across Key Stage 3 to improve literacy

 

£49,072

 

 

13%

(Met forecast)

Targeted Strategies and Initiatives

  • One-to-one tuition in literacy and numeracy
  • Easter and Half-term Revision Programme
  • Bespoke careers advice and work experience placements
  • Funding alternative curriculum packages
  • Supporting educational visits, breakfast clubs and extra-curricular activities
  • Subsidised music lessons
  • Supporting individual needs – e.g. Transport, school uniform, food technology ingredients
  • New initiatives - e.g. Motivational programme for targeted Year 11 students (inc revision guides etc)

Includes Contingency

 

£94,114

 

 

24%

(3% above forecast)

Total Anticipated Income/Planned Expenditure

£403,836

 

 

Impact on years expenditure

2019 results

 

PP (55 pupils)

Non-PP (197 pupils)

Difference

English Lang 4+

41.2%

62.5%

21.3%

English Lang 5+

23.5%

35.4%

11.9%

English Lang 7+

3.9%

4.2%

0.3%

Maths 4+

43.2%

70%

26.8%

Maths 5+

25.5%

39.4%

13.9%

Maths 7+

11.8%

12.4%

0.6%

EM  4+ / 5+

35% /11%

59%/29%

24%/18%

P8

-1.16

-0.27

-0.89

A8

31.24

41.13

9.89

EBacc

27% entered

11% Standard pass

4% Strong pass

45% entered

18% Standard pass

7% Strong pass

 

 

2015/16 – 2018/19 comparisons

 

15/16 * (66 Pupils)

16/17 

(72 Pupils)

17/18 

(79 Pupils)

18/19 

(55 pupils)

Difference between cohorts

PP P8 overall

-0.4

-0.35

-0.41

-1.16

-0.75  

PP P8 boys

-0.71

-1

-0.89

-1.35

-0.46

PP P8 Girls

-0.08

-0.58

-0.04

-0.94

-0.9

PP English 4+

50%

13%

15%

13%

-2%

PP English 5+

 n/a

6%

13%

13%

-

PP Maths 4+

42%

7%

8%

5%

-3%

PP Maths 5+

n/a

10%

4%

13%

+9%

*Cohort with old performance measures A*-C (non-Progress 8)

Achievement:

Pupil Premium students have seen their Progress 8 figure widen from the previous year. This was a result of a number of PP students entering the school with high KS2 figures and them not making sufficient progress compared to the previous cohort.  In addition, some students being educated offsite (PRU) and some PP students classed as persistent absentees has seem a strong impact upon the results.

A small percentage of these students followed a curriculum offsite offering only level 1 provision for open basket options.   Alongside these students were PP students with timetables amended to their needs, resulting in less slots completed.  Our academic performance of our PP Girls was significantly less than previous years. This was a result of a proportion of these subgroups being educated offsite, alongside multiple medical and behavioural barriers.

Attendance and Exclusions:

The attendance of Ever FSM has yet again increased by a 1% to 90.3%, although non-Ever FSM has decreased slightly by 1.5% to 93.7% from the previous year. The number of FSM persistent absentees, however, has again shown slight improvement. The attendance of all these students continues to be closely monitored and the local authority is involved when appropriate. We also have used many initiatives to try and improve this, including purchasing bus passes to support these students in getting to school.  Pupil Premium attendance was at 90.7% with Non-PP at 93.8%.

PP students make up 38% of fixed-term exclusions (FTE) at HBHS, during the 2018-2019 academic year.  This is a reduction on the previous year’s 56%.  This figure represents any FTE, to which a student could have multiple exclusions.  Closer scrutiny of the student’s curriculum and timetables have supported this reduction.

2019-20 Pupil Premium Planned Expenditure

 

£

% of PP funding

Leadership

Including allocated Vice Principal time, Director of Inclusion, Director of PP and Raising Achievement Coordinators.

  • Focusing on enacting key elements of the Sutton Trust research findings related to meta-cognitive elements and improving the quality of teaching
  • Identifying further research and best practice to influence future PP developments at HBHS
  • Developing the school’s work working with feeder primary schools to support the most challenging youngsters
  • Carrying out an impact evaluation of expenditure to inform future spending

£84,438

22%

Student Welfare

Including allocated time from Heads of Mini Community, Mini Community Support Officers, Student Welfare Team, Inclusion Team, Attendance Officer, Counselling and Youth Worker

  • Inclusion Team providing very high levels of personalised support to the school’s most challenging youngsters who experience significant barriers to their learning.  This work is particularly relevant in supporting students who may have behavioural, emotional and/or social difficulties to engage more positively with school and their learning with the aim of optimising their chances of fulfilling their potential
  • Improving contact with the harder to reach families through the work of the Inclusion Team, having a direct impact on improving children’s attendance and levels of engagement
  • Funding an Attendance Officer who focuses on both supporting and challenging students and their parents when their attendance is less than 95%
  • Part-funding a school counsellor to support individuals needs
  • Part-funding a Community Youth Worker who supports intervention programmes and coordinates Student Voice programmes.  This also supports students who may have behavioural, emotional and/or social difficulties to engage more positively with school and their learning
  • Supporting the Peer Mentoring and Peer Coaching initiatives, financing the training of the peer mentors and coaches to ensure that they have the requisite knowledge, skills and understanding to carry out their role effectively

£180,792

46%

Curriculum Staffing

Including allocated time from Literacy Team, Numeracy Team and Inclusion Teaching Staff

  • Maintaining the effective literacy and numeracy programmes that are in place to support students
  • Booster English and Maths lessons for Year 11 students
  • Targeted intervention using data analysis
  • Continuation of Accelerated Reader programme across Key Stage 3 to improve literacy

 

£50,951

 

13%

Targeted Strategies and Initiatives

  • One-to-one tuition in literacy and numeracy
  • Easter and Half-term Revision Programme
  • Bespoke careers advice and work experience placements
  • Funding alternative curriculum packages
  • Supporting educational visits, breakfast clubs and extra-curricular activities
  • Subsidised music lessons
  • Supporting individual needs – e.g. Transport, school uniform, food technology ingredients
  • New initiatives - e.g. Motivational programme for targeted Year 11 students

Includes Contingency

 

£72,853

 

19%

Total Anticipated Income/Planned Expenditure

£389,034

 

Barriers to achievement faced by disadvantaged students at HBHS

Barriers that currently our pupil premium students are facing are:

In addition, HBHS is experiencing students arriving from KS2 with high SATS scores in numeracy, but failing to retain the knowledge required for a KS3 Year 7 curriculum.

In addition, disadvantaged students are demonstrating a lack of stamina with their writing in examinations, alongside motivation for longer exams.

On a Careers note, the school frequently tackles the negative guidance and endorsement local colleges give to our disadvantaged students when applying for post 16 courses.  Disadvantaged students are frequently informed they would be accepted with functional skills in English or maths with no need for GCSEs in these subjects for various vocational (practical) courses.   

How will Impact be measured?

Impact will be measured upon by the summer results and the end of Term 6 cohort examinations.  The measurement of spending will be monitored across the year alongside all initiatives and CEIAG.

The next Pupil Premium review meeting will be held in July 2020 by Mr S.Waters (Vice Principal) for the September 2020 start.